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how to rearrange your living room 3

how to rearrange your living room 3

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1 Measure the living room from wall to wall, making note of the length and width of the room. First, draw a box, noting the measurements on all sides. Whether you create it on a computer program or hand draw it on graph paper, having a scale floor plan is helpful for space planning. Most of the time, converting feet to inches at a 1:1 scale is easiest. For example, a living room that measures 16 feet by 10 feet would convert to a 16-by-10-inch box. Then measure any furnishings that you’ve decided to include and create a separate uniquely-sized box for each piece. If drawing by hand, one idea is to create paper furniture cutouts (to scale) so you can play with different furniture arrangements. 2 Decide on a focal point. Deciding on a focal point will really help with space planning—a TV, fireplace, chandelier, artwork, et cetera. Once that is determined, the furniture arrangements can fall into place around it. If the living room involves a television, note that the viewing distance for a standard TV is between 8 to 12 feet maximum, and the viewing angle is no more than 30 degrees. So the main sofa or sectional should be placed facing that wall. Additional armchairs and chaises can flank either side of the television wall as well, rounding out the seating area while adding visual balance. To perfect this arrangement, consider incorporating custom furniture—a pair of unique upholstered armchairs makes a bold statement. For living rooms with a fireplace, most people consider conversation the most important goal. So a semi-circular furniture configuration around the hearth, with no more than 8 feet in between seats, promotes easy interaction with family and friends. For living rooms with neither a hearth or a television, a central focal point makes the most sense. Float a sofa (or two, facing each other) around a coffee table, with chairs placed around the circle to close any gaps. 3 Arrange tables, storage cabinets and ottomans. Once the seating area has been set (around the focal point), placing tables and storage cabinets is next. In a living room, the main coffee table or ottoman can be placed in the middle of the sofas and chairs. It’s best to allow 18 inches between a coffee table and sofa so drinks and the tv remote are within reach. Sofa tables are long, narrow tables that go behind a sofa, against its back. Side tables go next to the armchairs and on either side of the sofa. Be sure to allow at least 30 inches between furniture pieces in places where people need to pass through. For small spaces, consider nesting tables that can expand when in use and fold up when they are not needed. Storage cabinets and case goods are placed against the wall, wherever the space allows. Media consoles and TV stands go under the television, and credenzas are usually placed on the longest wall. Etageres are high, open cabinets that display souvenirs, books, accessories and family photographs, and look best on a larger, empty wall so it doesn’t get crowded. Bar cabinets and bar carts are pieces that add an aura of glamour to the living room.


Have you ever felt that a room was just "off" somehow, but you just couldn't place what it was? Living rooms are arguably the most used spaces in the home, and need a good layout that promotes good traffic flow. Furniture spacing and placement is key to comfort and function! Keep these tips in mind when you are moving in or get a sudden urge to rearrange one weekend.


Draw a scale outline of your living room on graph paper. Refer to your measurements to create a map of your living room. Use your measurements to make it proportional: if the room's measurement is 40 x 80 (in any unit), you could make your map 40 squares by 80 squares, or 20 x 40, or 10 x 20. Choose the largest scale that will fit on your graph paper. Include a semicircle for each door that opens into the room, showing how much room it takes up as it opens. The easiest useful scale to remember is 1 graph paper square = 1 foot, or 1 square = 0.5 meters if you are used to the metric system. Write your scale (e.g. "1 square = 1 foot") outside your map on the same sheet of paper so you don't forget it. If your room has a wall that isn't at right angles, draw the two walls that connect to it, mark the two points where that angled wall hits the other two, then draw a straight line between them. If your room has a curved wall, you may need to sketch in a rough estimate of its shape after mapping its end points.


Our living room is primarily used as a tv room. Its a long room that is set up as an open concept formal dining and living room. We don’t use the dining area but repurpose it as an office area. The ‘focus wall’ in the living area has a large fireplace, the other two walls have large tall and wide windows. Our tv is 50 inches and we just can’t find a space for it without blocking a window or using the empty space between the dining and living area…which doesn’t have electrical outlets and would be flat out hideous. Any suggestions? Also, I’ve never seen free room design websites. Can you suggest a few?


How to Arrange Living Room Furniture From family game nights to book club gatherings, the living room is a social hub. The proper placement of the room's furniture goes a long way toward making the space feel welcoming. Nothing is worse than a living room -- no matter how attractive -- where people have to perch against the walls, as if stuck there by magnetic force. Rather, push seating together so everyone can sit close and converse comfortably. Where to position this grouping depends on the natural focal point of the space. In some rooms, this is architectural, such as a fireplace or a set of windows. In other living rooms, the focal point is a television. Once you determine this feature, orient the seating toward it. This feature now has the attracting qualities the walls used to -- let the furniture gravitate there.


For most living rooms, select a few large elements and a few small elements. Unless you consider your living room extra small, extra large, or an unusual shape, follow these guidelines. A few large pieces of furniture should make up most of the furniture by volume. End tables, ottomans, and similar small items should complement these and provide footrests and drink stands, not obstruct passage through the room or turn a pleasing arrangement into a busy mess. For instance, a couch, an armchair, and bookcase can outline the usable space and set the color scheme. Two end tables and a small coffee table then serve useful functions and provide smaller objects for more visual interest without taking attention away from the larger pieces. See the Small Room and Large Room sections for advice on arranging unusually sized spaces. This can also apply if your living room is an odd shape, especially with angled walls that make the space appear too crowded or too spread apart.


When it comes to decorating a home, there are few things more intimidating than standing in an empty room and not knowing where to start. There are so many things to consider—personal aesthetic, lifestyle, budget and more—but the best way to begin is with the furniture layout. In other words, determining the arrangement of sofas, chairs, tables, storage cabinets and anything else that is involved in the room’s floor plan (any item that touches the floor). We’ve compiled a simple guide to follow that works for every room in the house, starting with the living room. These living room layout ideas will make the job of arranging furniture and decorating your home easy and enjoyable.


Search Add New Question Do I have to have an expert adviser visit my house and give advise and suggestions? wikiHow Contributor You don't necessarily need a professional interior design expert. Try to avoid putting large furniture, such as pianos, bookshelves, even small closets near or in front of windows. Also try to put your resting furniture, such as sofas, armchairs, and such nearer to the windows and put your television at an angle where the sun won't make a funny reflection. It really depends on your original design and how much space you have. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 0 Helpful 1 How should I arrange 2 curved couches to watch a large wall tv? Ella Make a half circle. Put one end to the other, with the inside of the arc facing the TV. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 0 Helpful 0 How should I arrange my living room furniture? Ella Be creative and decorate your living room in a way that is comfortable for you, because you'll be in it more than guests. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 0 Helpful 0 Can I split my furniture set in two and set it up on opposite sides of the room? wikiHow Contributor You certainly can. Adding an accent or area rug will define each space while adding color or patterns to the room. Be sure that you use a common color as your accent color throughout both spaces. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 0 Helpful 0